Courses

The CESD certificate program, because of its strongly interdisciplinary nature, takes advantage of the rich resources throughout the UA campus. The curriculum, which incorporates social science methods, communications, management, policy, and decision making, builds on courses taught through a variety of colleges and departments. For course schedule information, see the UA Academic Catalogue.

Core 1 - Overview Course

Course Number: 

GEOG 596M

Department: 

School of Geography and Development

Core Number: 

Core 1 - Overview Courses

The overarching goal of this seminar is to provide students with an understanding of the dynamics behind the interface between scientists and decision making that result in scientific information being incorporated into decision making.  This seminar explores foundational concepts of the science/decision-making interface, such as scientific information supply and demand, boundary organizations, co-production of knowledge, and knowledge networks, as well as the practical aspects of two-way communication to explore the ways in which exchanges take place between scientists and decision makers.

For information about this course visit Professor Connie Woodhouse's website about her courses.

Core 2- Methods in Social Science

Course Number: 

AED 617

Department: 

Department of Agricultural Education

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

Principles and practices of planning, designing, conducting and reporting research and scholarly activities in education, extension, other social science disciplines, and agricultural technology management. Course Goal: To develop an ability to consume and/or conduct quantitative social science research. 

Course Number: 

AIS 548

Department: 

American Indian Studies

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

This integrative course is designed to help students become professional and ethical researchers who produce the highest quality scholarship.  The identification of significant research problems and the choice of appropriate and rigorous methodologies and techniques will be discussed.  Students will gain experience in formulating a research problem that is theoretically important to American Indian Studies, well focused, and can be done in a reasonable amount of time.  Special attention will be given to formulating a realistic Master's thesis project.

Course Number: 

ANTH 605

Department: 

Anthropology

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

This is a skills-based class designed to (1) help students conduct independent ethnographic fieldwork and (2) learn how to write an effective grant proposal. Research skills to be discussed include: sampling and research design; selecting methods appropriate for particular populations; questionnaire development; interviewing skills (including key informant interviews and focus groups); collecting narrative data; participant observation; the use of visuals and card sorts in fieldwork, and other methodological areas. Students will gain experience in using an ethnographic software package (Atlas.ti) and will learn how to code transcribed interview data. Other issues to be addressed include one's social identity as a researcher and ethical issues working with the IRB and in the field.

Course Number: 

CPH 544

Department: 

Public Health

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

Evaluation is essential to all research and service based programs.  The course provides all students interested in pursuing an advanced public health degree with the fundamentals of planning and evaluation.  In addition to core issues surrounding evaluation (e.g., measurement and design) the role of the evaluator in the planning and implementation phases of research and service-based public health programs is highlighted.  The relationship between areas of specialization and evaluation will be a central theme throughout the course. 

Course Number: 

DVP 631

Department: 

School of Geography and Development

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

Building on the introductory methods course, this course reinforces the basic qualitative and qualitative tool set, including rapid appraisal, participatory appraisal, formal surveys, team ethnography, and so forth. The course further introduces the use of GIS, remote sensing, and other techniques into development problem solving (e.g. in community vulnerability mapping). This course also focuses on the skills needed for the management and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data using standard software packages, as well as the professional interpretation and presentation of findings. Students will apply these techniques to data collected during the previous summer field practicum, in this way integrating the applied field experience into the classroom. Student teams research projects, in collaboration with community partners.

Course Number: 

DVP 640

Department: 

School of Geography and Development

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

This course introduces students to the "culture of inquiry", the basic principles of applied, problem-solving research, and the logic of a mixed methods approach. It then relates research methodology to the development context as defined by the project cycle and project design principles, information systems and management, livelihood and vulnerability assessment (including health, nutrition, and environmental assessment), community and participatory planning, project monitoring and evaluation, and proposal development. In providing a comprehensive overview of the role of information in development, the course is designed to build decision skills in the choice of method and the management of information. Instruction will be provided by faculty and practitioner experts in these fields.

Course Number: 

GEOG 696Q

Department: 

School of Geography and Development

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

This seminar is a graduate experience intended to improve the participants' ability to design, deliver and measure the performance of Participatory and Collaborative Systems (PCS) in their own work and research.  The seminar covers philosophical considerations of PCS, performs a survey across a range of participatory and collaborative methods, and examines state-of-the-art efforts in PCS across a range of disciplines and application domains using case studies from a range of journals.  To the degree possible during the semester, there will be active participation in a mandated public meeting process. For more information, contact Dr. Keiron Bailey: kbailey@email.arizona.edu

Course Number: 

GEOG 516F

Department: 

School of Geography and Development

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.  Graduate-level requirements include a 15 page term paper dealing with the integration of social science and GIS. Specific topics must be agreed upon in advance with the instructor. The paper will be completed in stages and due dates for selecting a topic, and for the completion of a précis, an outline and the paper will be posted on the course D2L site.

Course Number: 

JOUR 489/589

Department: 

Journalism

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

Students will be exposed to qualitative and quantitative research methods, such as historical and legal research, media analysis, content analysis, in-depth interviewing and discourse analysis. 

Course Number: 

MGMT 600

Department: 

Management and Organizations

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

Conceptual and theoretical frameworks for the analysis of management problems from a behavioral science perspective. Emphasis on formulation of research questions and alternative research strategies for answering them.  A broad intro to social science methods aimed at our (very diverse) entering PhD students. No prerequisites. The core idea is to give the participants an over-view understanding of the methods available to them -- experiments, surveys, quasi-experiments, archival studies, case studies, etc) -- and the advantages, drawbacks and pitfalls of each.

Course Number: 

PA 553

Department: 

Public Administration and Policy

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

The course will focus on quantitative tools to empower students to assess the effectiveness and impact of policy. First semester methods include Ordinary Least Squares, Hypothesis Testing, Logistic Regressions, Instrumental Variables, and Time Series Methods, as well as specification choice, robustness testing, and incorporating uncertainty. The semester will end with Cost Benefit Analysis and Cost Effectiveness. In addition to our core content, each week students will read an article utilizing a quantitative policy analysis method to understand the approach and critique the model assumptions. Homework assignments will put theory into practice and teach students coding skills using STATA. The second semester will introduce additional tools, including natural experiments, randomized control trials, quasi-experimental methods (including difference-in-difference, regression discontinuity, panel data techniques), and a primer on Computable General Equilibrium models.

Course Number: 

PLG 597Q

Department: 

Planning

Core Number: 

Core 2 - Methods in Social Science

Public participation is both ethically and legally a fundamental component of planning decision making processes. This course explores a wide variety of public participation methods and tools, what to expect from working with the public, and how to handle disputes that arise.  Students will be given a variety of public participation tools and then utilize them as a team in a real life public participation project over the semester. This course is designed for undergraduate and graduate students with no prior background or experience in the fields of public participation, negotiation, or dispute resolution.

Core 3 - Communications

Course Number: 

AED 537

Department: 

Agricultural Education

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

The goal of the course is to develop individuals who are prepared to facilitate learning in multiple situations, with different audiences, in order to serve as leaders and communicators in the state, nation, and world.Students will plan, facilitate, and assess learning experiences for myriad situations. Students will be able to identify and apply resources and methods for facilitating learning with multiple audiences. Students will also learn how to develop objectives and assessments, as well as design materials to use in the facilitation process. 

Course Number: 

AGMT 422/522

Department: 

Agricultural Education

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

Principles and processes of knowledge diffusion and methods of transferring appropriate technology to user/clientele groups. Communicating effectively within organizations. Graduate-level requirements include an additional report.
 

Course Number: 

COMM 620

Department: 

Communication

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

A theory seminar of historical and theoretical perspectives on communication strategies used in social influence attempts from interpersonal to mass media contexts. 

Course Number: 

ENVS 415/515

Department: 

Soil, Water, and Environmental Science

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

Scientists speak a different language, a dialect filled with abstract symbolism, hypotheses and references to Latin and Greek. In this course, students learn journalism techniques to translate environmental science topics into language a layperson could appreciate. The writing concepts will apply to any field of science, as well as grant proposals, public reports and media including web-based publishing. Students also learn techniques for converting numbers into relevant statistics. Students will "workshop" in groups and work closely with the instructor to produce publication-quality articles on assigned or agreed-upon topics. The best of these could be posted on university-affiliated websites, with credit given to the author.  Graduate-level requirements include an additional final project writing a grant proposal or writing a feature article for a specified magazine or newspaper worth 50 points and a higher level of expectation regarding writing and reviews of their peers' work.

Course Number: 

JOUR 455/555

Department: 

Journalism

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

This hands-on course teaches you to write stories, shoot photos and produce infographics that illuminate the wonders and complexities of environmental discoveries, issues and the people behind them. This course emphasizes the role of the environmental journalist not as an advocate but as a reporter who accurately and fairly reports the news. You’ll find interesting angles in journal articles, interview scientists, evaluate competing claims made by sources, write accurate stories about complex concepts and processes, and respond to editing. Readings, discussions and guest speakers explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about the environment, such as balance, scientific uncertainty, ethical codes and the differences between environmental journalism and environmental communication. 

Questions? Write to Carol Schwalbe at cschwalbe@email.arizona.edu
 
NO PREREQUISITES. OPEN TO UA STUDENTS IN ALL MAJORS

Course Number: 

JOUR 465/565

Department: 

Journalism

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

This discussion course introduces students to the professional, legal, economic and ethical factors that affect print, broadcast and digital journalists as they cover science and the environment. Guest speakers—both science journalists and scientists—explore the ways in which science news both reflects and influences the attitudes of the public and policymakers. Readings, case studies and discussions look at issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, accuracy and ethical codes for science journalists.

Questions? Write to Carol Schwalbe at cschwalbe@email.arizona.edu
 
NO PREREQUISITES. OPEN TO UA STUDENTS IN ALL MAJORS

Course Number: 

JOUR 472/572

Department: 

Journalism

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

This hands-on course covers the basics of writing compelling, substantive stories about science discoveries, issues and the people behind them. You’ll also shoot photos and produce an infographic to accompany your stories. Readings, discussions and guest speakers explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about science, such as balance, scientific uncertainty, accuracy, ethical codes and the differences between science journalism and science communication.  

Questions? Write to Carol Schwalbe at cschwalbe@email.arizona.edu
 
NO PREREQUISITES. OPEN TO UA STUDENTS IN ALL MAJORS

Course Number: 

RNR 595A

Department: 

School of Natural Resources and Environment

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

Communication and political skills are critical for natural resources professionals to be effective in their positions, no matter if they are laboratory researchers, field biologists or directors of government agencies.  We will first discuss the importance of these skills in natural resource management. We will then examine effective techniques for interpersonal and group communication, negotiation, personnel management, project/time management, defense against "dirty politics" and methods to address job burnout as they relate to natural resources professionals. Students will learn techniques through lectures, outside speakers, class discussions, and case histories.  During this course, we will also examine various points of view on important natural resources issues and how the above skills might be applied to work with various stakeholder groups.

Course Number: 

RNR 596L

Department: 

School of Natural Resources and Environment

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

As a graduate student in some area of environmental science, much of your graduate education will focus on developing expertise in your particular area of interest, as well as developing enough knowledge to bridge to other related areas of environmental science.  But your ability to be effective and make major contributions over the course of your career will also depend greatly on your personal vision of where you are headed and the leadership and communication skills needed to get there.  These skills are as important as any technical expertise you may be acquiring but few classes specifically focus on developing them.  In this course, we will discuss concepts presented in "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People", skills associated with effective professional communication using "Escape from the Ivory Tower", and examples of environmental scientists that seem to be very effective.

Course Number: 

WFSC 595A

Department: 

Wildlife and Fisheries Science

Core Number: 

Core 3 - Communications

Communication and negotiation skills for conservation professionals working with state, federal, local  agencies, and private landowners. Integrating views of partners and adversaries in decisions on management of ecosystems and  endangered species. Consensus and decision making in managing wildlife. Taught odd-numbered years. 

Electives

Course Number: 

AED 621

Department

Department of Agricultural Education

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Developing and evaluating programs in teaching and extension; situationanalysis, objectives, policies, content, procedures, and evaluative criteria. Examines programevaluation concepts, principles, and models; and identifies major steps in planning, conducting,and reporting results of evaluation objects. 

Course Number: 

AIS 531A

Department: 

American Indian Studies

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

An introduction to the growing literature on traditional ecological knowledge and its relationships to the ecological and social sciences. Graduate-level requirements include preparing for and leading a class discussion on a specific topic.

Course Number: 

AIS 541A

Department: 

American Indian Studies

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course is a survey of basic issues and concepts in natural resource management and the environment in Native communities using integrated case studies that survey all the major varieties of environmental issues in Indian Country in the 21st century. A central theme will be developing tribally-specific solutions to rebuilding the resiliency of degraded ecosystems. We will consider particular case studies such as: tribal sovereignty, land tenure, reserved rights and Native claims; Native knowledge systems and Western science; co-management and restoration; water; fish and wildlife; agriculture and rangeland management; energy, mining and nuclear waste; and global climate change. Graduate-level requirements include increased length of writing assignments.

Course Number: 

AREC 575*

Department: 

Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Theory and application of economic concepts needed to evaluate water and environmental laws and policies; including benefit cost analysis, externalities, public goods and valuation methodologies. Case studies include federal, state, tribal and international water and environmental policies.

Course Number: 

CPH 526

Department

Public Health

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course will provide an introduction to environmental justice concepts as they apply to public health.  Issues relating to race/ethnicity, gender, social class, environmental policy and law will be used to critically examine environmental health disparities. Graduate-level requirements include additional meetings with the professor.  A 10-12 page term paper on a topic and degree of complexity to be determined in conjunction with the professor.

Course Number: 

DVP 621

Department: 

Development Practice

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course focuses on the management of natural resources within ecosystems. It introduces students to the management of land and water resources in the context of developing countries. Technical unites explore the management and engineering of irrigation systems, water and sanitation, alternative sources for energy, integrated watershed management, and urban and rural land planning. The course also examines the human element of natural resource management as evidenced in resource-tenure systems, environmental policy, indigenous knowledge systems, participatory management practices, and collaborative management for ecosystem services. The course further introduces the student to techniques for monitoring development using remote sensing and geographic information systems, cost benefit analysis for planning, and multi-criteria decision analysis.

Course Number: 

ENVS 544

Department: 

Soil, Water, & Environ Science

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

A guided journey through real world environmental law; U.S. legal system, major environmental laws-criminal and civil; common marketplace problems and solutions; high profile cases; essential professional skills.  Graduate-level requirements include extra term papers and case studies.

Course Number: 

ENVS 596B

Department: 

Soil, Water, and Environmental Science

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course focuses on current Arizona water policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Through readings, research, discussion and presentations, the student is exposed to current water resource issues facing Arizona and other parts of the West and policies to address them.
 

Course Number:

GEOG 516E

Department:

School of Geography and Development

Core Number:

Core 4 - Electives

Introduces principles and practices of Geovisualization (Geoviz) and softwares (Community and ERDAS Image).  Graduate-level requirements include an instructor-approved, scholarly paper on a related topic in Geoviz.  The paper will be 5-8 double-spaced, typewritten pages and provide a scholarly analysis and critique of a significant real-world Geoviz application. Pre-req: GEOG 516A, GEOG/RNR 517 or consent of instructor. 

Course Number:

GEOG 517

Department:

School of Geography and Development

Core Number:

Core 4 - Electives

Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.   Graduate-level requirements include a thorough bibliographic review and a scholarly paper on a current application of geographic information systems in the student's major field.

Course Number:

GEOG 596J

Department:

School of Geography and Development

Core Number:

Core 4 - Electives

Management and policy challenges driven by surface water and groundwater scarcity will be assessed for the Southwest US, Mexico, and globally. Critical review of institutions coupled with assessment of emerging management systems will lead to consideration of policy alternatives. 

Course Number: 

GEOG 696O

Department: 

School of Geography and Development

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Climate change, urban growth, energy demand, and global food trade alter water in coupled human-natural systems. This seminar addresses adaptation and resilience using material on river basins, aquifers, infrastructure, policy, and institutions from Southwest U.S., transboundary U.S.-Mexico, and international cases. 

Course Number: 

HWRS 543A

Department: 

Hydrology & Atmospheric Sci

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

A multidisciplinary course based on evaluating risk as the loss expected from environmental catastrophes or from the failure of systems designed for environmental protection.  Examples will be drawn from hydrology, atmospheric science, and geology.  The emphasis is on adapting the tools of probabilistic risk assessment to environmental analyses.  Graduate-level requirements include a written review of a seminal paper and its presentation in class.

Course Number: 

LAW 603J

Department: 

College of Law

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Over the past twenty years sustainability (or sustainable development) has emerged as a central goal of environmental policy making. Sustainability has moved from the work of scholars and activists to laws and administrative regulations. The language of sustainability has extended to the world of business and commerce. This class examines the meaning, application and value of the concept of sustainability from a variety of disciplinary perspectives; primarily law, political science and ecology. Many courses in law school and in various graduate programs might be said to touch on issues of sustainability. This course is intended to wrestle head-on with the concept and its evolving meanings and uses. The close study of one central concept will hopefully reveal general insights about environmental law, science and policy, and indeed about the interplay of law, science and policy in other areas. The study of a concept rather than the law of the concept produces a set of materials that only occasionally look like those typical to law school course (i.e., case law and statutes) and will lead us to reflect regularly on institutions other than courts and the role of lawyers as policy makers and citizens more often than advocates and counselors. 

 

Course Number: 

LAW 641

Department: 

Law

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

The course in Water Law traditionally emphasizes state law rules that govern rights to use surface water and groundwater throughout the country.  Although we will give ample attention to the prior appropriation doctrine, riparian water rights, and various systems for regulating groundwater use, this course will also emphasize how federal law may impact water rights.  Increasingly, environmentalists and others claim that there are public rights to water that may take precedence over rights under the prior appropriation system.

Course Number: 

LAW 643D

Department: 

James E. Rogers College of Law

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course will examine several themes:  conflicts over which government has sovereign control over which resources; the role that  tribal governments play in natural resource allocation and management; questions relating to ownership of natural resources; the changing federal policies relating to natural resources allocation; the role of federal courts, Congress, and Executive branches in relation to the trust responsibilities to protect tribal lands and resources; environmental protection, including EPA policy in relation to Indian Reservations; and  natural resource development and management.

Course Number: 

PA 581

Department: 

Public Administration and Policy

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Role of government in management of energy, natural resources and environment; process and policy alternatives; special attention to the Southwest.  Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and a substantial research paper of at least 25 pages in length. 

Course Number: 

PA 561A

Department: 

Public Administration and Policy

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Global climate change is widely considered the greatest threat confronting societies and governments today. Over the last decade a consensus has developed among natural and physical scientists over the likely causes of global climate change. Businesses, governments, and citizens have begun to respond by developing a variety of strategies, policies, and institutional arrangements designed to reduce human contributions to climate change and promote adaptation to the environmental impacts that are beginning to emerge. These ¿policy¿ responses are truly diverse in form and scale, from voluntary carbon markets and business certification programs, to command and control type regulations, to international treaties.

Course Number: 

PA 582

Department: 

School of Government and Public Policy

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course focuses on how to manage collaboration in highly controversial environmental and natural resource conflicts. The course will draw on cases from texts and articles as well as focus on several disputes that have occurred or are ongoing in the American Southwest. The primary goal is to help participants become better consumers and producers of collaborative processes and tools and to encourage thoughtful critique, analysis and evaluation.

Course Number: 

PA 584

Department: 

School of Government and Public Policy

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course is a survey of environmental management and economics to maximize social benefit. Covering pollution control, nonrenewable resource extraction, and natural resource management, we address both theory and policy in practice to determine when markets work, when they fail, and what policy can do to help. We also discuss the taxonomy of value and introduce stated- and revealed-preference valuation techniques. This course aims to empower students with a set of tools to rigorously evaluate a range of real-world issues at the human-environment nexus through the synthesis of science, economics, and policy. Basic math (graphing and algebra) will be used in this course, but all concepts will be reviewed during the first class.  Students taking this course for graduate credit will complete all the required homework and exams with the undergraduates. In addition, they will also complete a 15-20 page research paper.

Course Number: 

PLG 572

Department: 

PLG

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course focuses on the complex linkages between human and natural systems. Environmental planning utilizes methodologies which are systematic, iterative, and transparent and relies on integrating a wide spectrum of contemporary environmental issues in order to achieve more sustainable land use outcomes. As an interdisciplinary course, it draws from the fields of planning, geography, design, land use law, public policy, economics, natural science, and engineering among others. This course aims to equip students with a broad knowledgebase which focuses on landscape components and processes. Further, students will develop the necessary land use analysis and management skills in order to help guide land use decision making, engage stakeholders, and minimize/mitigate conflict between natural and built systems in an effort to produce more sustainable land use patterns and plans.  Graduate-level requirements include five additional hands-on exercises designed to help graduate students develop skills suitable for professional practice in the field and writing a two page synopsis and critical review of a coastal zone management program.

Course Number: 

PLG 597S

Department: 

PLG

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Examines contemporary competition between environment, resources (water, energy), social equity, and economic viability in the community development and revitalization arena. Public policy, planning initiatives, design strategies and technical solutions that bridge the conflicting agendas are analyzed. Field investigation of contemporary cases. Appropriate for students specializing in planning, architecture and landscape architecture.

Course Number: 

RNR 596G

Department: 

School of Natural Resources and Environment

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Whatever your specialty, this course will provide you with strategic, timely, and comprehensive information on climate change impacts within regions and sectors of the U.S., prepare you to engage in environmental problem solving in the context of climate change, and introduce you to key individuals in the climate-related research community.  The current U. S. National Climate Assessment is the main text for this course; the class will discuss and evaluate the environmental, social and physical impacts occurring and projected to occur in the U.S., and complete an original climate assessment report.

In the associated Practicum, graduate students will be mentored in actually conducting a next-generation assessment to be submitted as a technical input document for consideration by the authors of the fourth National Climate Assessment.

Graduate level requirements include developing a proposal to conduct an impact or vulnerability assessment or research project for a specific region, sector or issue and presenting the proposal in class. Practicum participants will actually conduct an assessment to be submitted to the 4th National Climate Assessment as a technical input document.

Course Number: 

RNR 696W

Department: 

Renewable Natural Resources

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

This course is designed to introduce students to the various ways that water science, societal forces, and public policy intersect, and to familiarize students with the various units on campus addressing complex interdisciplinary water management questions.

Course Number: 

RNR  580

Department: 

Renewable Natural Resources

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Resource policy formation; ethics of resource use; administration and organization for resource management; analysis of present policy and trends.  Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth policy analysis paper. 

Course Number: 

STAT 574E

Department: 

Statistics

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Statistical methods for environmental and ecological sciences, including nonlinear regression, generalized linear models, temporal analyses, spatial analyses/kriging, quantitative risk assessment. 

Course Number: 

STAT 574S

Department: 

Statistics

Core Number: 

Core 4 - Electives

Techniques of statistical sampling in finite populations with applications in the analysis of sample survey data. Topics include simple random sampling for means and proportions, stratified sampling, cluster sampling, ratio estimates, and two-stage sampling. Recommended prerequisite: introductory course on statistics and probability.